Ivan Andreyevich Krylov (Russian: Ива́н Андре́евич Крыло́в; February 13, 1769 – November 21, 1844) is Russia’s best-known fabulist and probably the most epigrammatic of all Russian authors. Formerly a dramatist and journalist, he only discovered his true genre at the age of 40. While many of his earlier fables were loosely based on Aesop’s and La Fontaine’s, later fables were original work, often with a satirical bent.

The Tree

Seeing a peasant pass with axe in hand, " Good fellow,'' to him said a youthful Tree, " Please, hew me down this wood, which here doth stand So close that it prevents my ...

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The Lion and the Panther

Once in the days of old, A lengthened war between a Lion and Panther bold Raged for the woods, and dales, and caves which they disputed. To yield to others' rights ne'er ...

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The Elephant in Luck

A Lion to an Elephant once lent A gracious ear. At once through all the forest went The rumour oft, and, as oft haps, the guesses ; How into favour could he wriggle thus ...

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The Ear of Corn

Within a dale an Ear of Corn, swaying unto the wind, A flower in a hothouse seeing Petted with warmth, behind The panes in comfort, he himself still being Exposed to moth ...

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The Roach

Although no prophet I, When moths I see around a candle wind, My prophecy come true I often find : That they to burn their wings will fly. Thou, my good friend, the lesso ...

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The Cuckoo and the Eagle

The Eagle to a Cuckoo gave the rank Which nightingales enjoy. The Cuckoo, thus made great, Sitting upon an ash in state, In music, majesty to thank, Her talent did employ ...

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